Changes ….

Change is something that has cropped up a lot for me, both personally and from a work point of view. Around this time last year, I decided to leave my job, sell my house and move North (there were personal reasons for that, it wasn’t a wild whim). That involved leaving a job I’d had for about 3 times longer than any other job I’d had, a place I’d lived in for longer than elsewhere, and possibly a change of country (depending on your view of the relationship between Scotland and England).
Since moving, I’ve now found a new job; in a different, albeit related field. I’ve arrived in a University that’s undergoing changes itself, into a team that’s undergoing change. I’m working in a field that is changing rapidly – if I think about my first computer, things have changed a lot
flickr photo shared by Emmadukew under a Creative Commons ( BY-NC-SA ) license
So, from that point of view, I’d have thought I’d find change not too difficult, but it’s not as easy as just learning a new OS. Well, not to me!

I was recently lent Who Moved My Cheese, which is a bit “American”; but makes a good point, about how different people react to change, and, I think, different types of change. I think I have a bit of “Sniffy” “Scurry” “Hem” & “Haw” in my, I suspect everyone does.

All of that said, I am enjoying my new role, working with new colleagues, getting to see an Educational Technologists view of eLearning, getting to grips with different systems, both organisational and technical, and even getting used to a train, rather than a bike in the morning. (It’s a lot drier!)

One of the changes I’d intended to make was to start blogging more often; there is time yet for that to happen! (Oh, and we’re moving house again soon, though this time about 1 mile across town, not 700 miles north!)

And it’s tiring! I’ve got a long weekend – so am really looking forward to it.

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We are smarter than me.

We are smarter than me, now a book, originally started out as a wiki. I’d heard of it before in passing, though not actually checked it, until I read Becta’s “Emerging Technologies for Learning” (Vol 3)
The wiki is still there; I’ve not got the book, so I can’t compare the two; however, it should be possible to work out what was the version that went to the printers by the dates of edits in the history.
I’ve skim read it; it seems to have a fairly strong business slant with chapter headings such as:

Chapter 2: We Can Research It
… examines how communites and social networks can help define new product lines, replacing some of the functions of traditional R&D groups as well as some product development.
Chapter 3: We Can Make It
… explores how community can help not just in product development and planning, but in the actual manufacturing of the product itself.
Chapter 4: We Can Market It
People are more likely to buy a product when it has been recommended by a friend. How can communities be created around product offerings and then leveraged to effectively market a product? Chapter 5: We Can Put a Price On It
This chapter will discuss how community input and direction can help businesses set pricing of products, services and/or experiences.

Of course, not all of the chapters have business slanted titles; but I guess if that’s what “we” want, I, and other educators have to contribute so that there are more chapters along the lines of

Chapter 11: We Can Train Ourselves
…explores the ways in which communities help to create dynamic learning spaces for the continued training and enrichment of its members.
Chapter 13: We Can Develop the Technologies
…explores the explosion of open source technology and its implications for corporations moving forward.
Chapter 15: Social Behavior Behind Communities
The rest of the book discusses the multiple ways communities are interacting with our society, making jobs easier, faster or different. But, what makes people want to take part in these communities?