EDUCAUSE | Resources | Educating the Net Generation

EDUCAUSE | Resources | Educating the Net Generation

A New EDUCAUSE e-Book

This is a whole book that’s online. It can either be downloaded as a complete PDF, or you can get single chapters. (One of the drawback of getting the whole book at once, is that there are no external hyperlinks. If you go for chapter at a time, then you get them.)
The list of contents looks promising:
1. Introduction
Diana G. Oblinger and James L. Oblinger, Editors

2. Is It Age or IT: First Steps Toward Understanding the Net Generation
by Diana Oblinger, EDUCAUSE, and James Oblinger, North Carolina State University

3. Technology and Learning Expectations of the Net Generation
by Greg Roberts, University of Pittsburgh–Johnstown

4. Using Technology as a Learning Tool, Not Just the Cool New Thing
by Ben McNeely, North Carolina State University

5. The Student’s Perspective
by Carie Windham, North Carolina State University

6. Preparing the Academy of Today for the Learner of Tomorrow
by Joel Hartman, Patsy Moskal, and Chuck Dziuban, University of Central Florida

7. Convenience, Communications, and Control: How Students Use Technology
by Robert Kvavik, ECAR and University of Minnesota

8. The Real Versus the Possible: Closing the Gaps in Engagement and Learning
by Judith Ramaley, University of Maine, and Lee Zia, National Science Foundation

9. Curricula Designed to Meet 21st-Century Expectations
by Alma Clayton-Pedersen and Nancy O’Neill, Association of American Colleges and Universities

10. Support Services for the Net Generation
by James Wager, The Pennsylvania State University

11. Faculty Development for the Net Generation
by Anne Moore, John Moore, and Shelli Fowler, Virginia Tech

12. Learning Spaces
by Malcolm Brown, Dartmouth College

13. Net Generation Students and Libraries
by Joan Lippincott, Coalition for Networked Information

14. The New Academy
by Carole Barone, EDUCAUSE

15. Planning for Neomillennial Learning Styles: Implications for Investments in Technology and Faculty
by Chris Dede, Harvard University

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